Names of Dolls of All Nations from 1940s?

by Sylvia
(Lyle, WA. USA)

Miss Spain?

Miss Spain?

Miss Spain?



I have 11 dolls that I collected as a young teenager in the 1940s, and one other, smaller one, whose history I don't know.


Some I can ID--Miss Scotland, Spain... others I have no idea. Would like some reference place to find names, values, etc.

Comments for Names of Dolls of All Nations from 1940s?

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Jul 24, 2013
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Atlantic Richfield Gas Station
by: Becky

The first two dolls and the last are from Atlantic Richfield Gas station's (ARCO) back in the 60's. The collection was called, "12 Beautiful Dolls of the World". You have Spain, Sweden & Holland. It seems most of the style of dolls all had their clothes stapled on. I think what a previous reader said about the middle on is most likely correct. I've had the entire collection since I was young that my dad would get for me at the ARCO station when he'd get gas, so that's why I know what year they come from, definitely not the 40's.

Oct 03, 2012
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Duchess Dolls Corp. 1948 to 1949
by: Nancy

The four dolls you have pictured, I am not famillar with. These could have been the ones from New York 11, NY. Mine that I had were the ones from Jackson Heights,NY and came in Red, Blue, and White boxes. If yours are the New York 11, NY; they came in Blue & White boxes. You mention that you have 11, but I only was able to see 4. Sorry I can't help you any more than this.

Jan 02, 2011
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Dolls of All Nations
by: Anonymous

Another good reference book is: Small Dolls of the 40s & 50s by Carol J. Stover. This books shows dolls in a bell from A & H Doll Corp., Brides of All Nations by Mrs. Friedman of NY, Dream Girl dolls and House of Dolls with no manufacturer on the box, Doll Bodies Inc., Hollywood Doll Mfg. Co., Midwestern Mfg. Co., Plastic Molded Arts, Stashin Doll Co. and Virga Creations.

I agree, Duchess Dolls made millions of these Display/Character Dolls and are marked on their backs with a copyright of 1948.

Sears sold these dolls under the patent name Happi-Time in the 1940s-50s. Arco Gas also gave out these dolls with their gas sales.

The doll in your second picture looks like a Admiration Doll Co. dolls Carol-Sue as they dressed them very inexpensively with a ribbonbodice and stapled the dress on the doll. Ouch!

Happy hunting on eBay. Mint In Box dolls have a better chance of selling. You may want to keep them for sentimental value as they don't bring much on auction.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!
Diane

Jan 02, 2011
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Dress-me Dolls
by: Ellen of Dr. Es Doll Mujseum

Hello and Happy Holidays and Happy New Year. I have similar dolls from the 40s and 50s, and my own from the 60s. There were several companies making and distributing these dolls. They include Duchess Dolls, Molley E.,Virga, Carlson Dolls, and Mangleson's Crafts. They were also sold in elaborate boxes under the name "Dolls of All Nations." When I was about eight in the mid-sixties, Patio Mexican dinners sold them for $1.00 each with a coupon from the box of frozen Mexican food. Texaco and other gas stations gave them out as premiums in the late sixties and early seventies.

My friend, who grew up in the fifties had some, and she called them "Suzy Sweeheart," and I've also seen them called "Dress-me Dolls" and "Mary Ann." Many called them Storybook Dolls, too, though they were not Nancy Ann, Hollywood, or Peg O' My Heart by Kerr and Hinze.

I have variations that are made like a Barbie, but with the distinctive head. There were 12 inch dolls that had jointed legs you could buy to dress at Newberry's and Woolworths, and in the fifties, there were somet his size elaborate dressed as historical women. I have Elizabeth Woodville from the series; she was the mother of Henry VIII. There was an entire set in the state museum in Carson City, NV when I was a little girl. They may still be there.

Try Pat Smith's books on Modern Collector's dolls, as well as books by Denise van Patten, and early 60s and 70s issues of National Doll Word, Doll Castle News, and Women's Household magazines. Craft magazines from these years and earlier have patterns for crocheting or knitting outfits for these dolls. An earlier version of them was made out of composition, and these, too, had patterns created for them. Many are dressed as foreign dolls in costume,or as Native American dolls. I also have versions of Martha Washington and Betsy Ross. Some were plastic with painted eyes.

I like them very much, and still buy them when I see some I like, even if they are just parts. They inspire me and are fun to dress. Also, try the web museum at the Strong Museum National Museum of Play. Hope this helps.

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